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dc.contributor.authorAlola, Andrew Adewale
dc.contributor.authorArikewuyo, Abdugaffar Olawale
dc.contributor.authorÖzad, Bahire
dc.contributor.authorAlola, Uju Violet
dc.contributor.authorArikewuyo, Halima Oluwaseyi
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-02T22:24:07Z
dc.date.available2020-05-02T22:24:07Z
dc.date.issued2020en_US
dc.identifier.issn0944-1344
dc.identifier.issn1614-7499
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/11363/2123
dc.descriptionConference Conference: 14th International Francophone Symposium on Aquatic Ecotoxicology (EcoBIM) - From Legacy Pollutants to Emerging Contaminants Location: Univ Bordeaux, Bordeaux, FRANCE Date: MAY 22-25, 2018en_US
dc.description.abstractIn either case of ecological and biocapacity surplus or deficit, the precautionary effort toward optimizing the natural capital posits a potential framework for environmental sustainability. In studying the environmental account of fertility, marriage, and technological advancement in the USA and Canada, the autoregressive distributed lad-bound testing is employed over the experimental period 1990-2014. Importantly, the study revealed that the interaction of fertility and marriage exerts a significant and negative impact of biocapacity in both the USA and Canada and in short run and long run. Moreover, while the impact of energy use in both countries is significant and positive in both the short and long run, the magnitude of the impact is almost negligible. Similarly, an improvement in technological advancement in the countries is empirically observed to cause a decline in the biocapacity in both the long and short term. These posit that both energy use and technological advancement in Canada and the USA do not necessarily improve the productive capacity of the countries ecosystems. In general, the study provides policy frameworks for stakeholders toward addressing the environmental peculiarity of the USA (a biocapacity debtor) and Canada (a biocapacity creditor).en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherSPRINGER HEIDELBERG, TIERGARTENSTRASSE 17, D-69121 HEIDELBERG, GERMANYen_US
dc.relation.isversionof10.1007/s11356-019-06719-1en_US
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessen_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/*
dc.subjectEnvironmental Sustainabilityen_US
dc.subjectBiocapacityen_US
dc.subjectFertility rateen_US
dc.subjectMarriage rateen_US
dc.subjectICTen_US
dc.subjectUnited Statesen_US
dc.subjectCanadaen_US
dc.subjectECOLOGICAL FOOTPRINTen_US
dc.subjectRENEWABLE ENERGYen_US
dc.subjectHUMAN-POPULATIONen_US
dc.subjectTIME-SERIESen_US
dc.subjectPOLLUTIONen_US
dc.subjectIMPACTen_US
dc.subjectGROWTHen_US
dc.subjectEARTHen_US
dc.subjectSINGLE-MOTHER FAMILIESen_US
dc.titleA drain or drench on biocapacity? Environmental account of fertility, marriage, and ICT in the USA and Canadaen_US
dc.typearticleen_US
dc.relation.journalENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND POLLUTION RESEARCHen_US
dc.contributor.departmentİktisadi İdari ve Sosyal Bilimler Fakültesien_US
dc.identifier.volume27en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.startpage4032en_US
dc.identifier.endpage4043en_US
dc.relation.publicationcategoryMakale - Uluslararası Hakemli Dergi - Kurum Öğretim Elemanıen_US


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